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Seiko watches

The history of Seiko is a bit complicated for those who do not know much about Japanese watches. Seiko has been around since the year 1924 and was established by a man named Seiko Asakawa. Mr. Asakawa wanted to introduce a watch that was elegant and luxurious looking but affordable to all. His first attempt was to create a thin, sleeker and more feminine design, which still stands strong to this day.

Seiko was originally only available in Japan, as its movement did not meet the standards of the Japanese Regarded as being high-tech at the time. To get Seiko watch movements working correctly, it needed to be certified by the Japanese Watch Association (JWA) and the American Watch Association (AWA). Seiko Watches was offered to retailers in North America, Europe and Australia, however, there was a problem. American retailers could not offer Seiko because of the prohibitive cost. A solution was found with the Seiko distributors.

American distributor Earl B. Smith began selling Seiko Watches in New York, which was the only place that Seiko authorized outside of Japan. Earl Smith had met with great success in New York, and it was here that the first Seiko Watch was sold. Seiko was extremely popular in America, and it was soon introduced to the rest of the world. Many companies, including Seiko itself, benefited from this association, and American catalogues were no longer sparse with Seiko watches.

The Seiko History 101 would have us believe that Seiko was created out of nothing more than a bright red back lid. In fact, the watch actually has four lids that can be opened, and each lid houses a particular watch. The back lid, or bezel as it is called, was created by Utsuro Happo. He designed the Seiko bezel using a combination of cutting glass and aluminum. The goal being to make a watch that had the highest accuracy possible.

The manual wind watch was developed by Seiko Master Watchmaker Sadamitsu Ichihiro in Scale, Hygiene, and Precision Laboratory No. 7. This model was a major improvement over the previous manual wind watches that Seiko had been making. This improvement was made with the use of a new technique called "Internal Standard Quartz". This technique was a huge leap forward for Seiko watchmakers.

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